Investment and Trading Books

There are literally hundreds if not thousands of investment and trading books out there that focus on every imaginable market.  From strictly discussing stocks and options to full out strategies, chances are that if you can think of a subject regarding the market, there’s a book about it.

In this section, we list trading books we think represent some great starting points for the novice investor.  On this list are a mixture of books that our team members have read and others that we may have not read personally but are widely regarded as either “must reads” or are very popular.  If it made our list but none of us have had a chance to personally read, we’ll let you know.

With that said, please enjoy our little reading corner.  You won’t find smooth jazz playing in the background or café latté’s, just sources of knowledge we feel will further develop your trading and investing skills as you embark on your journey.

Trading Books of Choice

 

A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing

In the tenth edition of A Random Walk down Wall Street, Malkiel evaluates and emphatically stands by his original investment thesis, that it is extremely rare for an individual investor to consistently beat the stock-market averages. Investors are better off buying and holding an index fund than attempting to buy and sell individual securities or actively managed mutual funds. An index fund which buys and sells all the stocks in a broad stock-market average is likely to outperform professionally managed funds whose high expense charges and large trading costs detract substantially from investor returns. With commentary on numerous investment issues, this readable investment guide for individuals offers information on the full range of new investment products available, the results of current research by academics and other marketplace professionals, and a section on investment strategies for retired investors or those anticipating retirement. This excellent book offers important information for individual investors and is a valuable resource for library patrons. –Mary Whaley

 

Wall Street Lingo: Thousands of Investment Terms Explained Simply by Nora Peterson

This book is a tremendous resource when dealing with the ever changing, complex world of financial markets and terminology! Nora has put together a deeply researched and extensive compilation of Wall Street terms and definitions that will be useful for novice investors and experienced financial professionals. It is a must have home or office desk reference.

 

 

A Beginner’s Guide to Day Trading Online by Toni Turner

Day trading is highly profitable–and highly tumultuous. Moreover, the financial markets have changed considerably in recent years. Expert author Toni Turner gives you the latest information on mastering the markets, including: decimalization of stock prices; new trading products such as E-minis and Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs); and precision entries and exits

 

The Truth About Day Trading Stocks: A Cautionary Tale About Hard Challenges and What It Takes To Succeed

“A brutally honest depiction of the reality of trading. Great stuff. If you’re new to the trading game, this book will shorten your learning curve and—if you take its lessons to heart—it just might save you money and grief.”
—Jason Alan Jankovsky, author of The Art of the Trade and Trading Rules that Work

 

Technical Analysis Demystified: A Self-Teaching Guide

Chartered Market Technician Constance Brown explains the many different types of technical analysis tools and how to use them. Key topics covered include charting, moving averages, trends and cycles, oscillators, market patterns, Fibonacci ratios, price data, risk-to-reward ratios, and much more. Featuring end-of-chapter quizzes and a glossary, this straightforward guide makes technical analysis easy to understand and apply to your strategy of spotting-and profiting from-market trends and patterns.

 

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